The Emerald Oriental

Emeraude3 Lots of other perfume families are more inclusive than the oriental one.  The florals put up with all sorts of aberrations in their near relations. Everything from  fruity florals to aldehydes, and you get the same extended range with chypres, and a broad spectrum with fougeres too, i.e. floral fougeres, aromatic fougeres, woody fougeres, but orientals are either spicy or ambery. Period.  There really is no such thing as the green oriental.


If you go right back to the beginning of French perfumery, and there lost in the swirling mists of pre-history (which means the 1920s), you get Emeraude. The name means emerald in the first place, so you know right from the get-go that Coty figured he’d gotten hold of something very green indeed. Continue reading