Mithridates, He Died Old

“Come, my Friends,
Let’s meet these Romans, and my Rebel Son;
Let’s kill till we are weary, then lie down
And rest forever.”

“Mithridates King of Pontus”  by Nathaniel Lee (1653 – 6 May 1692)*

Mithridates (134 BC – 63 BC) was the great eastern enemy of Rome in the days before Caesar Augustus.  Depending on your political inclinations, he was either the bold standard bearer of an oppressed minority defending his many loyal subject against a brutal Empire,  or just another swell-headed killer on the make. Continue reading

The Emperor’s New Scent

It was Mrs. Bonaparte who turned the general on to scent.  Left to his own devices, Napoleon might have preferred the smell of gunpowder in the morning, but he was besotted by Josephine and perfume was – civilizing.

It is something of a stretch to say that he brought perfume back into fashion.  Those who survived the Terror needed some cheering up, and if that meant champagne and perfume,  so be it.  He certainly did nothing to stop it, as a more dour sort of dictator might have done.  The coast was officially clear, the old royal perfume house of Houbigant returned to Paris, and the good times began to role once more.

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