Tag Archives: Dolce Tuberose

Coverlet of White Flowers: Dolce Tuberose, Splendid Gold, and Sparkling Diamond

coverletThe temperature finally rose, our teeth are no longer chattering hard enough to shake the fillings out, and outdoors it is a comparatively banana belt 36 degrees (fahrenheit). Thank heavens for upper air movements.

I’ve stuck to my resolution not to wear anything but florals all week, and have ended up pleased with the effect.  No heavy ambers, no gourmands, no complicated orientals, not even any leathers.  This week was florals and nothing but florals, most of them white.

It ended up being a bit of a Krigler fest because my self discipline failed and I bought another set of samples and went a bit hog wild with them.  Then too, the savvy people at Krigler enclosed a few freebies and I got to try Splendid Gold and Chateau Krigler as well.

Unfortunately, Continue reading

Spinning Sugar

sugarWhen the current perfume fever originally spiked around 2002 or so, one of the first aspects of new perfumes that spiked in tandem, was their sugar content. Perfumes were like bon bons, and no doubt this was mostly due to the success of Angel, and the whole family of gourmands generally, but the effect was sometimes…sticky.

Like everyone else I read the Guide and remember Luca Turin blaming a good deal of the candy floss on ethyl maltol, which is evidently a fairly inexpensive synthetic, that powered his favorite Vanilia as well as Angel.  Ethyl maltol was everywhere in those days.   Continue reading

Coco Avant Numero Cinq?

Sem_Chanel_1919Yesterday I was in New York and of course I stopped off at the Plaza.

Well, I suppose there is no “of course” about this, as I had planned all along to stop at the Plaza  specifically so that I could go and sniff the perfumes at the Krigler kiosk there, but these are my vagaries and it is enough that my family puts up with them. They had already “put up” with stopping at Federic Malle’s on Madison. (“What’s this?” “Le Parfum de Therese.” “Okey-dokey, why is it here?” “Because a famous perfumer composed it for his wife.” “Um, OK, so why’s it here?” “Because he’s dead now and so is she, and the family decided it could be marketed.” “OK, so if it’s for Therese, why do the rest of you want it?” ”Mom, why are there, like, booths in there?” “For the perfume.” “Oh…That’s creepy.”) Continue reading